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The Temple Of Man: A Guide to the Symbolic and Metaphysical Meaning of the Temple of Luxor


The Temple Of Man: A Masterpiece of Sacred Geometry and Ancient Wisdom




Have you ever wondered what secrets lie hidden in the ancient temples of Egypt? Have you ever felt a mysterious connection between yourself and the cosmos? Have you ever wanted to explore the depths of your own consciousness and discover your true potential?




The Temple Of Man.pdf



If you answered yes to any of these questions, then you might be interested in reading one of the most fascinating and profound books ever written on the subject of ancient Egypt: The Temple Of Man by R.A. Schwaller de Lubicz.


In this article, we will give you an overview of what this book is about, why it is important, and how it can change your life. We will also provide you with some practical tips on how to read and study this book, as it is not an easy one to digest. But trust us, it is worth the effort.


Introduction




What is The Temple Of Man?




The Temple Of Man is a monumental work of scholarship, wisdom, and insight that reveals the hidden meaning and purpose of the ancient Egyptian temple of Luxor. It is based on the research and observations of R.A. Schwaller de Lubicz, a French philosopher, mathematician, alchemist, and Egyptologist who spent 15 years studying the temple in detail.


The book consists of two volumes, totaling over 1000 pages, with hundreds of illustrations, diagrams, and photographs. It covers a wide range of topics, such as architecture, art, symbolism, mythology, religion, science, history, psychology, philosophy, and metaphysics.


The book was first published in French in 1957, and later translated into English in 1998. It is considered by many to be one of the most important and influential books ever written on ancient Egypt, as well as one of the most challenging and rewarding ones to read.


Who was R.A. Schwaller de Lubicz?




R.A. Schwaller de Lubicz (1887-1961) was a remarkable man who dedicated his life to the pursuit of truth and wisdom. He was born in Alsace, France, and showed an early interest in science, mathematics, art, and spirituality. He studied various esoteric traditions, such as alchemy, hermeticism, gnosticism, rosicrucianism, and freemasonry.


He traveled extensively throughout Europe, Africa, and Asia, seeking knowledge and inspiration from different cultures and civilizations. He was especially drawn to ancient Egypt, which he considered to be the source of all wisdom and the cradle of civilization.


He moved to Egypt in 1936 with his wife Isha Schwaller de Lubicz, who was also a scholar and writer. They settled in Luxor, where they founded a research center called the Symbolist House. There, they studied the temple of Luxor and other ancient monuments, using a method of analysis that they called symbolist.


This method involved looking beyond the literal and historical aspects of the temple, and instead focusing on the symbolic and metaphysical ones. They believed that the temple was not just a building, but a living expression of a universal and eternal wisdom that they called the philosophy of the living.


What is the main thesis of the book?




The main thesis of The Temple Of Man is that the temple of Luxor is a representation of man, both in his physical and spiritual dimensions. It is also a reflection of the cosmic order, both in its mathematical and geometrical principles, and in its astronomical and astrological alignments.


In other words, the temple is a microcosm of the macrocosm, and a macrocosm of the microcosm. It is a synthesis of science and religion, of logic and intuition, of matter and spirit. It is a manifestation of the ancient Egyptian concept of maat, which means harmony, balance, justice, and truth.


The book argues that the ancient Egyptians had a profound understanding of the nature of reality, and that they encoded this knowledge in their temples, pyramids, statues, paintings, hieroglyphs, and myths. The book also claims that this knowledge is relevant and applicable to our modern times, and that it can help us to solve our problems and to evolve as a species.


The Symbolism and Meaning of the Temple of Luxor




The Temple as a Representation of Man




The Axis of the Temple




The temple of Luxor is oriented along an east-west axis, which corresponds to the direction of the sunrise and sunset. This axis symbolizes the life cycle of man, from birth to death, from dawn to dusk. It also symbolizes the journey of the soul, from the material world to the spiritual world, from darkness to light.


The temple has two entrances: one on the east side, facing the Nile river, and one on the west side, facing the desert. The east entrance represents the entrance to life, where the soul incarnates into a physical body. The west entrance represents the exit from life, where the soul leaves the physical body and returns to its source.


The temple also has two sanctuaries: one on the east side, dedicated to Amun-Ra, the supreme god of creation, and one on the west side, dedicated to Mut, his consort and mother goddess. The east sanctuary represents the origin of life, where the soul emanates from the divine essence. The west sanctuary represents the destination of life, where the soul reunites with the divine essence.


The Chambers of the Temple




The temple of Luxor consists of several chambers or halls that are connected by corridors or passages. These chambers represent different stages or levels of consciousness that man experiences throughout his life. They also represent different aspects or functions of his being: physical, emotional, mental, moral, spiritual.


The first chamber is called the peristyle hall, which has 14 columns and 7 doors. It represents the physical body of man, with its 14 limbs (2 arms, 2 legs, 10 fingers) and 7 openings (2 eyes, 2 ears, 2 nostrils, 1 mouth). It also represents the physical world that man perceives through his senses.


The second chamber is called the hypostyle hall, which has 32 columns and 16 doors. It represents the emotional body of man, with its 32 feelings (16 positive and 16 negative) and 16 desires (8 worldly and 8 spiritual). It also represents the emotional world that man experiences through his feelings.


The third chamber is called the vestibule, which has 12 columns and 6 doors. It represents the mental body of man, with its 12 faculties (6 rational and 6 intuitive) and 6 powers (3 active and 3 passive). It also represents the mental world that man creates through his thoughts.


The fourth chamber is called the sanctuary, which has no columns or doors. It represents the spiritual body of man, with its pure essence and infinite potential. It also represents the spiritual world that man realizes through his awareness.


The Colonnades and Statues of the Temple




s, which are mythical creatures with the body of a lion and the head of a man. These statues represent the dual nature of man, who is both animal and human, instinctive and rational, earthly and heavenly. They also represent the guardians of the temple, who protect its secrets and test its initiates. The temple of Luxor also has several statues of pharaohs and gods inside and outside its walls. These statues represent the ideal models of man, who embody the qualities and virtues of the divine. They also represent the ancestors and teachers of man, who guide and inspire him on his path. The Temple as a Reflection of Cosmic Order




The Mathematical and Geometrical Principles of the Temple




The temple of Luxor is built according to precise mathematical and geometrical principles that reflect the order and harmony of the cosmos. The temple is based on a unit of measurement called the royal cubit, which is equal to 52.5 cm or 20.6 inches. The royal cubit is divided into 7 palms or 28 fingers, which correspond to the 7 planets or 28 lunar mansions of ancient astronomy.


The temple is also based on a system of proportions called the golden ratio, which is equal to 1.618 or 0.618. The golden ratio is a universal constant that can be found in nature, art, and architecture. It is also known as the divine proportion, because it expresses the perfect balance between unity and diversity, symmetry and asymmetry, beauty and harmony.


The temple is also based on a pattern of geometry called the Flower of Life, which is composed of overlapping circles that form a hexagonal grid. The Flower of Life is a sacred symbol that represents the creation and interconnection of all life forms. It contains within it various shapes and figures, such as the Seed of Life, the Tree of Life, the Fruit of Life, and the Merkaba.


The Astronomical and Astrological Alignments of the Temple




The temple of Luxor is aligned with various astronomical and astrological phenomena that reflect the cycles and movements of the cosmos. The temple is oriented along an east-west axis, which corresponds to the direction of the equinoxes, when day and night are equal. The temple also has a north-south axis, which corresponds to the direction of the solstices, when day or night are longest.


The temple is also aligned with specific stars and constellations that have symbolic significance for the ancient Egyptians. For example, the east entrance of the temple faces the star Sirius, which is associated with Isis, the goddess of magic and wisdom. The west entrance of the temple faces the constellation Orion, which is associated with Osiris, the god of resurrection and rebirth.


the temple is dedicated to Mut, who is associated with the Moon, Cancer, and water. The Hieroglyphic and Mythological Language of the Temple




The temple of Luxor is decorated with various hieroglyphs and images that reflect the language and mythology of the ancient Egyptians. The hieroglyphs are a system of writing that combines phonetic symbols, ideograms, and determinatives. They convey both literal and symbolic meanings, depending on the context and the level of interpretation.


The images are a system of art that combines realistic and stylized representations of humans, animals, plants, and objects. They convey both aesthetic and symbolic values, depending on the form and the function. They also follow a set of rules and conventions that govern their size, shape, color, orientation, and placement.


The hieroglyphs and images of the temple tell various stories and legends that illustrate the beliefs and values of the ancient Egyptians. They depict various scenes and events that relate to the creation and maintenance of the world, the gods and goddesses who rule over it, the pharaohs and priests who serve them, and the people and animals who inhabit it.


The Implications and Applications of The Temple Of Man




How The Temple Of Man Challenges Modern Science and History




One of the implications of The Temple Of Man is that it challenges the conventional views of modern science and history regarding ancient Egypt. The book suggests that the ancient Egyptians had a sophisticated and advanced civilization that was based on a different paradigm than ours. It also suggests that they had access to a source of knowledge that was lost or forgotten by later generations.


For example, the book shows that the ancient Egyptians had a profound understanding of mathematics, geometry, astronomy, astrology, physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, psychology, philosophy, and metaphysics. They also had a complex system of religion, spirituality, ethics, art, culture, and politics. They were able to build monumental structures that defy explanation by modern standards.


and America. They also had a legacy and impact that lasted until the present day. How The Temple Of Man Inspires Spiritual and Personal Growth




Another implication of The Temple Of Man is that it inspires spiritual and personal growth for those who study and apply its teachings. The book offers a comprehensive and holistic view of reality that integrates science and religion, logic and intuition, matter and spirit. It also offers a practical and experiential way of learning that involves observation, analysis, synthesis, and realization.


For example, the book teaches that the temple of Luxor is not only a physical structure, but also a symbolic and metaphysical one. It is a representation of man and the cosmos, as well as a reflection of man and the cosmos. It is a tool for understanding and transforming oneself and one's environment. It is a path for attaining wisdom and enlightenment.


The book also teaches that the temple of Luxor is not only a historical monument, but also a living one. It is a manifestation of the ancient Egyptian philosophy of the living, which is based on the principle of maat. It is a expression of the harmony, balance, justice, and truth that governs all life forms. It is a source of inspiration and guidance for living in harmony with oneself, others, and nature.


How The Temple Of Man Offers a Vision for a New Humanity




A third implication of The Temple Of Man is that it offers a vision for a new humanity that can overcome the challenges and crises of our modern times. The book proposes a new paradigm that can restore the lost connection between man and the cosmos, between science and religion, between logic and intuition, between matter and spirit. It also proposes a new way of being that can foster the development of human potential, creativity, and consciousness.


For example, the book suggests that the temple of Luxor is not only a model of the past, but also a blueprint for the future. It is a prototype of a new type of architecture that can harmonize with nature and human needs. It is also a prototype of a new type of society that can respect diversity and promote cooperation.


a symbol of the new humanity that can embody the qualities and virtues of the divine. Conclusion




In conclusion, The Temple Of Man is a masterpiece of sacred geometry and ancient wisdom that reveals the hidden meaning and purpose of the temple of Luxor. It is based on the research and observations of R.A. Schwaller de Lubicz, who spent 15 years studying the temple in detail.


The book shows that the temple of Luxor is a representation of man and the cosmos, both in their physical and spiritual dimensions. It also shows that the temple of Luxor is a reflection of the cosmic order, both in its mathematical and geometrical principles, and in its astronomical and astrological alignments.


The book also shows that the temple of Luxor is a manifestation of the ancient Egyptian philosophy of the living, which is based on the principle of maat. It also shows that the temple of Luxor is a source of knowledge and wisdom that can challenge, inspire, and transform us.


The book is not an easy one to read, but it is worth the effort. It can open our eyes to a new perspective on reality, and open our hearts to a new way of living. It can help us to discover our true nature and potential, and to realize our divine origin and destiny.


FAQs




Here are some frequently asked questions about The Temple Of Man and their answers:



  • Where can I buy or read The Temple Of Man?



You can buy or read The Temple Of Man online or offline from various sources. For example, you can order it from Amazon or Barnes & Noble, or you can borrow it from a library or a friend. You can also find it in PDF format on some websites, such as Archive.org or Scribd.com.



  • How long does it take to read The Temple Of Man?



psychology, philosophy, and metaphysics. It is not a book that you can read in one sitting, but rather a book that you need to study and contemplate over time.



  • What are some tips for reading and studying The Temple Of Man?



Here are some tips for reading and studying The Temple Of Man effectively and enjoyably:



  • Read the book with an open mind and a curious heart. Don't be afraid to question or challenge your own assumptions and beliefs. Don't be discouraged by the complexity or difficulty of the book. Don't be bored by the details or repetitions of the book. Instead, try to appreciate the depth and richness of the book.



  • Read the book with a pen and a notebook. Take notes of the main ideas and concepts of the book. Make diagrams or sketches of the illustrations and images of the book. Write down your own questions and reflections on the book. Review your notes regularly and revise them as needed.



  • Read the book with a friend or a group. Share your insights and opinions on the book. Discuss your doubts and difficulties on the book. Learn from each other's perspectives and experiences on the book. Support each other's progress and growth on the book.




  • What are some other books or resources that are related to The Temple Of Man?



Here are some other books or resources that are related to The Temple Of Man and that you might find interesting or helpful:



  • Sacred Science: The King of Pharaonic Theocracy by R.A. Schwaller de Lubicz. This is another book by the same author that explores the philosophical and metaphysical foundations of ancient Egyptian civilization.



  • Serpent in the Sky: The High Wisdom of Ancient Egypt by John Anthony West. This is a book by an American writer and researcher who was influenced by R.A. Schwaller de Lubicz and who popularized his work in the West.



  • The Ancient Secret of the Flower of Life by Drunvalo Melchizedek. This is a book by a modern spiritual teacher who uses the Flower of Life as a key to understanding the sacred geometry and ancient wisdom of various civilizations, including ancient Egypt.



the constellation Orion and that they encode a message about the origin and destiny of humanity.


  • The Code Book: The Science of Secrecy from Ancient Egypt to Quantum Cryptography by Simon Singh. This is a book by a British author and mathematician who traces the history and development of cryptography, or the art of writing and deciphering secret codes, from ancient Egypt to modern times.




  • What are some benefits of reading and studying The Temple Of Man?



Here are some benefits of reading and studying The Temple Of Man for yourself and for others:



  • You will gain a new perspective on reality that is based on a holistic and integrative view of science and religion, logic and intuition, matter and spirit.



  • You will learn a lot about ancient Egypt, its culture, history, art, architecture, religion, philosophy, science, and wisdom.



  • You will discover your true nature and potential as a human being who is both a reflection and a manifestation of the divine.



  • You will develop your skills and abilities in observation, analysis, synthesis, and realization.



  • You will enhance your creativity and consciousness by using symbols, images, numbers, and words as tools for expression and transformation.



  • You will contribute to the evolution of humanity by sharing your knowledge and wisdom with others.



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